Prez Sez

Hello foggies and welcome to 2018!

We are kicking off another year and I hope it can be an impressive one. As always we will be doing a cleanup day this year in March, and I hope we can see some PhD presentations from some of our esteemed membership. A working bee or two, some educational sessions too. A picnic on the mount… no wait wrong song! Our usual mix, sprinkled with some time outdoors enjoying the park.

Online stuff- this may be a year of technology for FOGGs.

Parks Victoria have launched a website called ParkConnect, to help people find and join volunteer groups and organisations. The idea being it will allow people new to an area, or travelling through to find a local group or activity to be part of. Three members of our committee attended a workshop to learn its operation, from the team that developed the site. At that workshop we listed FOGGs on the portal. This may allow people to join us and maybe bring in some new members. They can join the group from the website, but would not be true members until they have attended an event and paid their fees. I would request our existing members who are tech savvy to go to ParkConnect, set up a profile and join the FOGG group on the portal. This will allow us and Parks Vic to keep track of volunteer hours in the park. We do need to add more information to the page, and that will happen in due course, but it is a work in progress. There is opportunity through this profile setup to list all skills and certifications that members have. This means those skills can be recorded and utilised, allowing some activities to be expanded by making use of the member/volunteer skill set.

Some of the committee including those that attended the training session need to log on and finish putting details into our page, but the bare bones are there, allowing us to be found.

An app has been launched by the Victorian State Government Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) that enables native plant ID and includes a facility to map where species are being observed. I have only played with it briefly, but it seems to be a useful app. It does require mobile service to work, although you can photograph plants and upload the photos at a later date. It provides plant identification assistance, with basic species information. Using your smartphone or other mobile device you can upload photos of observed plants and this will automatically record a location. It will enable a more accurate vegetation map to be generated showing where native species are still hanging on, and even areas they have returned to! Automatic recording of location does concern me a little, we don’t want too much information about locations of rare species to be available, but it is a balance that has to be found.

Some years back our dedicated volunteer webmaster set up a system that allowed us to have email addresses for President, Secretary, Treasurer, Editor etc @friendsofgrampiansgariwerd. We haven’t adopted them and in some ways I feel it is to our detriment. The legitimacy it lends us as an organisation when communicating with government departments, filing grant applications, and press releases etc cannot be underestimated. I know I’m guilty of not trusting emails from an unknown source with a gmail address, I wonder how many others might be the same. We can remove that doubt. As a second advantage, imagine not having to learn new email addresses after each AGM. The email address would be tied to the position, not the person. I feel we should look into setting it up properly, Frank has volunteered to help us set up each office bearer and all will be easy to change to the new office bearer if need be. We will discuss this as a committee and make a decision.

I recently received a bag from a former FOGG president containing unused Red Gum Walk signs. As an organisation in the late 80’s and early 90’s we paid to have interpretive signs made up to install on the longer loop of the walk, which never got off the ground due to park management concerns at the time. I’d like to kick it off again and make Sue McInnes’s vision comes to pass. Several late members, founders of the group and former presidents dedicated them selves to this project. I grew up working on this project, it’s time we got it finished in some fashion.

We may not be able to do the longer loop, but I would like to see the original short loop properly reinstated. It’s irked me for years that we have been slow to do this. In some circles the walk is iconic, it started a nationwide trend of providing access to the environment for the less able to enjoy. It was the first walk in the Grampians that didn’t climb a hill or a mountain. It shouldn’t disappear quite yet! We can honour several people by working towards a new version, using old signs designed by renowned artists who believed in the project.

Cheers, Rod.